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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

The Gallery’s Acknowledgement of Country, and information on culturally sensitive and restricted content and the use of historic language in the collection can be found here.

Y-erran-gou-la-ga

published 1807
Nicolas-Martin Petit after Barthélemy Roger

from the series ‘Nouvelle-Hollande’
engraving, hand coloured on paper (sheet: 34 cm x 25.6 cm, plate-mark: 32 cm x 24.5 cm)

Though named in this engraving as 'Y-erran-gou-la-ga', this sitter is identified in the drawing on which this print is based as 'Mousqueda' – Musquito to the British. There were two men known as Musquito in Sydney when Baudin’s expedition stopped there in 1802. The better-known Musquito (c. 1780–1825), a Guringai man, was Bulldog’s accomplice in the 1805 Hawkesbury River raids and was sent to Van Diemen's Land having served his time for those offences. Though technically free after his arrival at Port Dalrymple in 1813, Musquito was prevented from making use of permission to return to Sydney, his proficiency in English and exceptional bush skills making him valuable as a tracker of ex-convict bushrangers. Despite Musquito's role in the apprehension of various reprobates, including the notorious Michael Howe in 1818, the authorities again denied him leave to return home. Disaffected, Musquito joined members of the Oyster Bay nation in their retaliations against white violence. He was later caught and executed. Other historians, however, believe this Musquito not to be the subject of Petit's portrait, positing that the work might be a depiction of the second Musquito – one of Bennelong's associates – who died in Sydney in February 1806.

Purchased with funds provided by Ross A Field 2008

The National Portrait Gallery respects the artistic and intellectual property rights of others. Works of art from the collection are reproduced as per the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (Cth). The use of images of works from the collection may be restricted under the Act. Requests for a reproduction of a work of art can be made through a Reproduction request. For further information please contact NPG Copyright.

Artist and subject

Nicolas-Martin Petit

Barthélemy Roger (age 40 in 1807)

Supported by

Ross A. Field (12 portraits supported)

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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders past and present. We respectfully advise that this site includes works by, images of, names of, voices of and references to deceased people.

This website comprises and contains copyrighted materials and works. Copyright in all materials and/or works comprising or contained within this website remains with the National Portrait Gallery and other copyright owners as specified.

The National Portrait Gallery respects the artistic and intellectual property rights of others. The use of images of works of art reproduced on this website and all other content may be restricted under the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (Cth). Requests for a reproduction of a work of art or other content can be made through a Reproduction request. For further information please contact NPG Copyright.

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