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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

The Gallery’s Acknowledgement of Country, and information on culturally sensitive and restricted content and the use of historic language in the collection can be found here.

Self portrait

1949
Frank Hinder

pencil on paper (sheet: 30.5 cm x 21.2 cm)

Frank Hinder (1906–1992), painter, illustrator and printmaker, exerted a major influence on the development of modern art in Australia. He received his first lessons in art from his father, an amateur painter, before studying with Antonio Dattilo Rubbo at the Royal Art Society and at the East Sydney Technical College. Unlike most of his artist contemporaries, Hinder went to the United States for further study, training at the Art Institute of Chicago school in 1927–28 and studying commercial art at the New York School of Fine and Applied Art and the Master Institute of the Roerich Museum. He worked as a commercial artist in America and taught at an art school in Boston before returning to Australia with his wife, the New York-born sculptor Margel Harris, and their daughter, Enid, in 1934. In Sydney, Hinder and Margel became involved with artists Ralph Balson, Grace Crowley and Rah Fizelle, enlivening the 1930s art scene with modernist work based on his experience of cubism. Among his best known works are those inspired by the city’s underground railway system, such as Subway, Wynyard (1948). Hinder was a founding member of the Contemporary Art Society and in 1939 helped organise Australia’s first exhibition of abstract art, Exhibition 1. Hinder worked in the camouflage unit of the Royal Australian Engineers during World War II, devising methods of concealing large structures such as the petrol storage tanks in Newcastle and Port Kembla. After the war, he taught at the East Sydney Technical College and the Sydney Teachers’ College and also worked in theatre design and commercial art. Hinder’s abstract paintings and electric light sculptures attracted much critical acclaim and he assisted Margel in the completion of a number of public sculpture commissions in the 1950s and 60s. This self portrait is characteristic of Hinder’s work in its sharp-edged precision.

Gift of an anonymous donor 2007
© Enid Hawkins (nee Hinder)

The National Portrait Gallery respects the artistic and intellectual property rights of others. Works of art from the collection are reproduced as per the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (Cth). The use of images of works from the collection may be restricted under the Act. Requests for a reproduction of a work of art can be made through a Reproduction request. For further information please contact NPG Copyright.

Artist and subject

Frank Hinder (age 43 in 1949)

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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders past and present. We respectfully advise that this site includes works by, images of, names of, voices of and references to deceased people.

This website comprises and contains copyrighted materials and works. Copyright in all materials and/or works comprising or contained within this website remains with the National Portrait Gallery and other copyright owners as specified.

The National Portrait Gallery respects the artistic and intellectual property rights of others. The use of images of works of art reproduced on this website and all other content may be restricted under the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (Cth). Requests for a reproduction of a work of art or other content can be made through a Reproduction request. For further information please contact NPG Copyright.

The National Portrait Gallery is an Australian Government Agency