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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

The Gallery’s Acknowledgement of Country, and information on culturally sensitive and restricted content and the use of historic language in the collection can be found here.

Shane Warne

2006
Robin Sellick

type C photograph on paper (frame: 122.5 cm x 107.0 cm, image: 117.0 cm x 100.0 cm)

Shane Warne (1969–2022) is considered by many the greatest spin bowler in cricket history. Born and raised in Melbourne, he played his first Test against India in Sydney in January 1992, and his last, against England, in January 2007. In between, he took 708 wickets and did more to secure Australian cricket victories than any other single player. After some inauspicious early Test performances, Warne took seven for 52 in the second innings of the Boxing Day Test in 1992; and he was the leading wicket-taker (with 34) for the Ashes series of 1993, during which he bowled out English batsman Mike Gatting with what is said to have been the 'ball of the century.' Warne scored his 150th wicket during the 1994–1995 Ashes series, and in January 1998 he became the second Australian bowler (after Dennis Lillee) to amass 300 Test wickets. During a series against New Zealand in March 2000, he surpassed Lillee to become Australia’s leading wicket taker; and during the 2005 Ashes series in England he became the first player ever to take 600 Test wickets. Warne weathered the fallout from various off-field transgressions to be named one of Wisden’s top five cricketers of all time, and Wisden’s Leading Cricketer in the World for 2004. Like Donald Bradman's and Keith Miller's, Warne's portrait hangs in the Long Room at Lord's Cricket Ground, but he is the only cricketer to have been honoured in this way while still playing. With Glenn McGrath, Warne was inducted into the International Cricket Council Cricket Hall of Fame in 2013. After retiring from first class cricket, he played in the World Series of Poker tournament and captained the Rajasthan Royals to victory in the Indian Premier League, while also becoming popular as a television commentator. He published an autobiography, No Spin, in 2018.

Robin Sellick photographed Shane Warne against the backdrop of the greenery surrounding the tennis court at the cricketer's Melbourne home. The portrait was one of five photographs by Sellick featured in the 2006 National Portrait Gallery exhibition Flash: Australian athletes in focus. Sellick grew up in Broken Hill, New South Wales, and began contributing to magazines including Vogue, Australian Style and Marie Claire from the mid-1990s, following a period of time working in New York. His portraits have appeared on the covers of NME, Q Magazine and German Rolling Stone and continue to be published around the world. Retaining a distinct influence of his early years, during which he was surrounded by bush characters with large personalities, Sellick's portraits are often characterised by a sense of theatricality and the use of brash, saturated colour. In photographing Warne and compatriots including Harry Kewell, Adam Scott and Mark Webber, Sellick examined the idolatry and celebrity of Australian sporting heroes, while also seeking to show them as ordinary people in their everyday surroundings.

Purchased 2006
© Robin Sellick

The National Portrait Gallery respects the artistic and intellectual property rights of others. Works of art from the collection are reproduced as per the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (Cth). The use of images of works from the collection may be restricted under the Act. Requests for a reproduction of a work of art can be made through a Reproduction request. For further information please contact NPG Copyright.

Artist and subject

Robin Sellick (age 39 in 2006)

Shane Warne (age 37 in 2006)

Subject professions

Sports and recreation

Related information

The Companion

Permanent collection catalogue

Café and shop

On one level The Companion talks about the most famous and frontline Australians, but on another it tells us about ourselves: who we read, who we watch, who we listen to, who we cheer for, who we aspire to be, and who we'll never forget. The Companion is available to buy online and in the Portrait Gallery Store.

Adam Scott by Robin Sellick

Portrait story

An interview with photographer Robin Sellick about his portrait of golfing champion Adam Scott.

Steve Irwin
Steve Irwin
Steve Irwin
Steve Irwin

Crikey!

Magazine article by Dr Sarah Engledow, 2006

Robin Sellick captured a rare moment of quietude from the late conservation star Steve Irwin.

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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders past and present. We respectfully advise that this site includes works by, images of, names of, voices of and references to deceased people.

This website comprises and contains copyrighted materials and works. Copyright in all materials and/or works comprising or contained within this website remains with the National Portrait Gallery and other copyright owners as specified.

The National Portrait Gallery respects the artistic and intellectual property rights of others. The use of images of works of art reproduced on this website and all other content may be restricted under the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (Cth). Requests for a reproduction of a work of art or other content can be made through a Reproduction request. For further information please contact NPG Copyright.

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