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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders both past and present.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are warned that this website contains images of deceased persons.

The Gallery’s Acknowledgement of Country, and information on culturally sensitive and restricted content and the use of historic language in the collection can be found here.

Marcia Langton

1982
Juno Gemes

gelatin silver photograph, selenium toned on paper, edition 1/3 (sheet: 60.8 cm x 51.0 cm, image: 44.0 cm x 31.7 cm)

Marcia Langton AM (b. 1951), Foundation Chair and Professor of Australian Indigenous Studies at the University of Melbourne, is a descendant of the Yiman and Bidjara nations of Queensland. Having travelled widely, she graduated in anthropology from ANU in the 1980s and worked on the 1989 Royal Commission into Aboriginal deaths in custody, writing the report ‘Too Much Sorry Business’. In the 1990s she undertook her doctoral fieldwork in eastern Cape York Peninsula; commencing her university teaching career in 1995, she became Ranger Professor of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies in Darwin. Having published Burning Questions: Emerging Environmental Issues for Indigenous Peoples in Northern Australia in 1998, she gained her PhD from Macquarie in 2005. Since then, based in Melbourne, she has published widely on topics in Aboriginal studies, including land tenure, art and agreement-making. Her most recent book is The Quiet Revolution: Indigenous People and the Resources Boom (2013). A fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences of Australia, she has served on many boards and committees related to indigenous issues, appears regularly in the media and engages in film and art criticism.

Juno Gemes photographed Langton, then in her early 30s, in Brisbane in 1982. In September-October that year, as the city hosted the Commonwealth Games, thousands marched in support of Aboriginal rights and wellbeing in spite of Premier Joh Bjelke Petersen’s having declared street marching illegal.

Purchased 2004
© Juno Gemes/Copyright Agency, 2021

The National Portrait Gallery respects the artistic and intellectual property rights of others. Works of art from the collection are reproduced as per the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (Cth). The use of images of works from the collection may be restricted under the Act. Requests for a reproduction of a work of art can be made through a Reproduction request. For further information please contact NPG Copyright.

Artist and subject

Juno Gemes (age 38 in 1982)

Professor Marcia Langton AO (age 31 in 1982)

Subject professions

Education and research

Related information

The Companion

Permanent collection catalogue

Café and shop

On one level The Companion talks about the most famous and frontline Australians, but on another it tells us about ourselves: who we read, who we watch, who we listen to, who we cheer for, who we aspire to be, and who we'll never forget. The Companion is available to buy online and in the Portrait Gallery Store.

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Vincent Brady leading anti Bicentenary Protest, Brisbane, 1987 Michael Aird
Vincent Brady leading anti Bicentenary Protest, Brisbane, 1987 Michael Aird
Vincent Brady leading anti Bicentenary Protest, Brisbane, 1987 Michael Aird

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© National Portrait Gallery 2021
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The National Portrait Gallery acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of Country throughout Australia and recognises the continuing connection to lands, waters and communities. We pay our respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and to Elders past and present. We respectfully advise that this site includes works by, images of, names of, voices of and references to deceased people.

This website comprises and contains copyrighted materials and works. Copyright in all materials and/or works comprising or contained within this website remains with the National Portrait Gallery and other copyright owners as specified.

The National Portrait Gallery respects the artistic and intellectual property rights of others. The use of images of works of art reproduced on this website and all other content may be restricted under the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (Cth). Requests for a reproduction of a work of art or other content can be made through a Reproduction request. For further information please contact NPG Copyright.

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